GDPR Frequently Asked Questions

GDPR Frequently Asked Questions

When is the GDPR coming into effect?

The GDPR was approved and adopted by the EU Parliament in April 2016. The regulation will take effect after a two-year transition period and, unlike a Directive it does not require any enabling legislation to be passed by government; meaning it will be in force May 2018.

In light of a uncertain ‘Brexit’ – I represent a data controller in the UK and want to know if I should still continue with GDPR planning and preparation?

If you process data about individuals in the context of selling goods or services to citizens in other EU countries then you will need to comply with the GDPR, irrespective as to whether or not you the UK retains the GDPR post-Brexit. If your activities are limited to the UK, then the position (after the initial exit period) is much less clear. The UK Government has indicated it will implement an equivalent or alternative legal mechanisms. Our expectation is that any such legislation will largely follow the GDPR, given the support previously provided to the GDPR by the ICO and UK Government as an effective privacy standard, together with the fact that the GDPR provides a clear baseline against which UK business can seek continued access to the EU digital market. (Ref: http://www.lexology.com/library/detail.aspx?g=07a6d19f-19ae-4648-9f69-44ea289726a0)

Who does the GDPR affect?

The GDPR not only applies to organisations located within the EU but it will also apply to organisations located outside of the EU if they offer goods or services to, or monitor the behaviour of, EU data subjects. It applies to all companies processing and holding the personal data of data subjects residing in the European Union, regardless of the company’s location.

What are the penalties for non-compliance?

Organizations can be fined up to 4% of annual global turnover for breaching GDPR or €20 Million. This is the maximum fine that can be imposed for the most serious infringements e.g.not having sufficient customer consent to process data or violating the core of Privacy by Design concepts. There is a tiered approach to fines e.g. a company can be fined 2% for not having their records in order (article 28), not notifying the supervising authority and data subject about a breach or not conducting impact assessment. It is important to note that these rules apply to both controllers and processors — meaning ‘clouds’ will not be exempt from GDPR enforcement.

What constitutes personal data?

Any information related to a natural person or ‘Data Subject’, that can be used to directly or indirectly identify the person. It can be anything from a name, a photo, an email address, bank details, posts on social networking websites, medical information, or a computer IP address.

What is the difference between a data processor and a data controller?

A controller is the entity that determines the purposes, conditions and means of the processing of personal data, while the processor is an entity which processes personal data on behalf of the controller.

Do data processors need ‘explicit’ or ‘unambiguous’ data subject consent – and what is the difference?

The conditions for consent have been strengthened, as companies will no longer be able to utilise long illegible terms and conditions full of legalese, as the request for consent must be given in an intelligible and easily accessible form, with the purpose for data processing attached to that consent – meaning it must be unambiguous. Consent must be clear and distinguishable from other matters and provided in an intelligible and easily accessible form, using clear and plain language. It must be as easy to withdraw consent as it is to give it.​ Explicit consent is required only for processing sensitive personal data – in this context, nothing short of “opt-in” will suffice. However, for non-sensitive data, “unambiguous” consent will suffice.

What about Data Subjects under the age of 16?

Parental consent will be required to process the personal data of children under the age of 16 for online services; member states may legislate for a lower age of consent but this will not be below the age of 13.

What is the difference between a regulation and a directive?

A regulation is a binding legislative act. It must be applied in its entirety across the EU, while a directive is a legislative act that sets out a goal that all EU countries must achieve. However, it is up to the individual countries to decide how. It is important to note that the GDPR is a regulation, in contrast the the previous legislation, which is a directive.

Does my business need to appoint a Data Protection Officer (DPO)?

DPOs must be appointed in the case of: (a) public authorities, (b) organizations that engage in large scale systematic monitoring, or (c) organizations that engage in large scale processing of sensitive personal data (Art. 37). If your organization doesn’t fall into one of these categories, then you do not need to appoint a DPO.

How does the GDPR affect policy surrounding data breaches?

Proposed regulations surrounding data breaches primarily relate to the notification policies of companies that have been breached. Data breaches which may pose a risk to individuals must be notified to the DPA within 72 hours and to affected individuals without undue delay.

Will the GDPR set up a one-stop-shop for data privacy regulation?

The discussions surrounding the one-stop-shop principle are among the most highly debated and are still unclear as the standing positions are highly varied. The Commission text has a fairly simple and concise ruling in favor of the principle, the Parliament also promotes a lead DPA and adds more involvement from other concerned DPAs, the Council’s view waters down the ability of the lead DPA even further. A more in depth analysis of the one-stop-shop policy debate can be found here.

Spambrella and the GDPR

Over the months leading up to the 25th May deadline, Spambrella will be mapping its internal data processes and enforcing its privacy policy. You will notice these changes as the deadline approaches. Changes such as enforced validation on all website forms will be enabled in March/April with a secure database collecting user information on all submissions. These submissions will be easily searchable and purged upon request.

For any other questions or a friendly conversation, please contact privacy@spambrella.com

>

Related Case Studies

Having moved away from McAfee, we quickly realised our customers had not settled. We decided to set up an open webinar with all customers and Spambrella. Over 80% of our customers opted to move and a positive decision it was!
The Spambrella team have been excellent. I highly recommend their services and technical expertise.

Harry Miller, Trafic Corp

Spambrella rescued us and our customers from uncertain times with Postini/Google and now McAfee. As an MSP we have relied upon Spambrella and their support for just over 2 years. Our experience has been positive and we have overcome obstacles using their support team for anything email related (sometimes out of their scope). We recommend Spambrella to all of our customers. Thanks!

Peter Kozak, Command ICT

With over 4k end user email users it was top priority that our migration was stable and quick. Spambrella proved to be the perfect choice with hands on technical assistance. We worked late nights migrating our customers from another email security vendor that increased their pricing without prior warning. We are very happy with Spambrella and will continue to recommend this service.

Steven Sumir, Hotel Cocoa

Our experience with Spambrella has been great.
Support is very responsive and provide a high level of value.

Highly recommend!

Monotype is one of the world’s best-known providers of type-related products, technologies and expertise.

Eimis Svabas, Monotype Imaging Inc.

As an MSP Kingdom provides best of breed packaged services to its clients. Spambrella was brought in to replace both our premium and SMB email security/filter options. Spambrella is quick and simple to set up and administer. The Proofpoint connection is valuable and enables us to quickly deploy policy based encryption which is becoming popular. Overall we cannot fault Spambrella as a service or as a team.

Tina McDonaldson, Kingdom Services

Spambrella has been a valued service addition to RCS London. Our clients are very happy with the security features Spambrella provides and the user interaction with the service has been simple and welcomed by all. RCS is a fast growth MSP in London UK and the business requires valuable additions like Spambrella. We recommend Spambrella to other MSP’s looking for a monthly subscription email security service.

Andrew Do, RCS London

Latest blog posts

  • On December 6, 2018
Office 365 Email Security – The Hidden Costs

You’ve made the big decision to migrate to Microsoft Office 365. Its array of cloud collaboration makes this a great decision. Yet at the same…

Read more
  • On October 2, 2018
Top Reasons to Choose Spambrella when relying on Office 365 security

Organizations using Office 365 are choosing Spambrella for the following reasons: Spambrella is more effective than Office 365 security in blocking spam, viruses and malicious…

Read more
  • On October 2, 2018
Sales Play Book – Value Proposition

Problem Statement Today’s email attacks (ransomware, business email compromise, and sandbox evasion) have evolved, and are outpacing the tools developed to combat them. While they…

Read more
  • On July 20, 2018
Business Email Attack Losses Now Top $12 Billion – FBI

Business Email Attack Losses Now Top $12 Billion The U.S. Government’s Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) released an open administration declaration this week cautioning that…

Read more